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CES 2016: NUA Robotics Makes A Suitcase As Loyal As A Dog
Tech Features

CES 2016: NUA Robotics Makes A Suitcase As Loyal As A Dog

For weathered travelers, a robotic luggage companion might be worth the screening checkpoints.

Carrying luggage can sometimes be a hassle if you’ve just got off the plane and into the unknown terminal of your destination. With more scrutiny on effectively keeping your personal belongings safe at the airport, having another pair of eyes could be helpful.

Enter the Robotic Suitcase, designed by Israeli company NUA Robotics. A carry-on that doesn’t need you to pick it up or help roll it along, it fact it should make life easier for the world-weary traveler. Aiming to be an invaluable companion that will make people rethink the aspects of robot as viable everyday tools.

With a built-in camera sensor, this smart suitcase can detect wherever you are and move alongside or behind you on flat surfaces, of course. Tracking also goes both ways since you can easily locate it through compatible smartphone apps and Bluetooth connectivity — when in use the robot can play keep up at an estimated 10 feet of distance.

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It can help forgetful travelers if they inevitably remember that their tablet or smartphone are minutes away from a dead battery; since this suitcase also has the ability to charge a device on the move. And anti-theft prevention by way of an alarm is included too, that will go off with any unwanted physical contact or interference (with potential wackiness and TSA interrogations in tow).

The demo showed the suitcase in action and worked well, but the presentation was brief for obvious reasons: in its current form it’s still in prototype form with some kinks to work out, and it not available yet. The plan is to get production underway in the coming months with a tentative release within a year of its CES premiere. With that said, pricing is also unknown.

The Robotic Suitcase was a cool distraction, a distinction that NUA Robotics CEO Alex Libman hopes their product breaks free from, and actually usable in other scenarios such as around the house and the task of grocery shopping.

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About the Author: Herman Exum