Quantcast
Skip to Main Content
vridniX
Game Reviews

vridniX

Offers breakneck thrills that should appeal to similar twitch platformers like Super Meat Boy and the like; only veterans need apply.

Spiffy Rating Image
Review + Affiliate Policy

vridniX storms onto the scene packed with similarities to other twitch platformers, challenging players with a breakneck pace and the ability to stick to ceilings with your character’s frankly comical tongue. It also requires you to keep moving at all times; think Speed, but with more tongue! The game’s visuals are nothing to write home about, but surely that won’t matter to fans of other fast-paced platformers who’d love another speedrunner challenge. Newcomers will surely have difficulty adjusting to the game’s speed, quite literally, and may want to seek their platforming thrills elsewhere.

The game’s controls should be immediately familiar, with responsive direction changes and tried-and-true wall-jumping abilities, adding mechanics like spinning/rotating environments on their heads with special orbs necessary to complete the increasingly dangerous levels. Thankfully, they never feel too long, despite the frequency with which you’ll have to retry them in order to progress. Generous auto-saves at the end of each one you complete help ease the pain of yet another playthrough. It can be frustrating to be constantly in motion, however, but the game occasionally puts you in the body of another character with slightly different mechanics, which felt like a refreshing change of pace.

via GIPHY

vridniX sports multiple boss fights, each interesting and unique in their own way, which given the rest of the game was was an unexpected (and welcome) surprise. The game’s slowly escalated intensity is presented at a perfect pace to learn and adapt to new situations that present themselves. Sometimes levels aren’t completed by the most obvious solution, and I expect there are tons of other secrets (not to mention the collectibles) I probably missed.

Story is also an important part of vridniX, and explains the boss fights and the occasional character changes you make. While the music is interesting and avoids being repetitive, the dialogue isn’t the great. The main character and his friend are supposed to be unlikeable, but characters blatantly shown to be such jerks can be a little annoying. vridniX (our hero/anti-hero) is a bit of a nuisance, and it’s obvious why most of the enemies in the game are out to get him. Is it possible to be too sympathetic for your enemies’ rationale?

Overall, vridniX offers solid twitch platforming thrills that should appeal to fans of similar classics like Super Meat Boy and countless others like it. The visuals aren’t anything to write home about and the gameplay is hardly groundbreaking, but stick with it long enough and you’ll probably start to see the obnoxious main character in your sleep. It’s high praise that a game could be based around such an unlikable “hero” and still come out smelling like roses.

About the Author: Evelyn Fewster